. Roper Parkington



Θα χρειαστείτε

. Roper Parkington

 

Wm. H. Quayle Jones; Professor Westlake, P.R.S Professor Holland; ProfessorBoydDawkins.P.R.S Capt. Herbert Thomson; Capt. Charles B. Balfour, M.P the Tory Burch Outlet Rev. W. H. Davies; and Messrs. T. G. Carver, K.C Charles Charleton; M. Mowat; John Chapman; Lewis R. S. Tomalin; W. Becket Hill; Stanley Machin; S. Gilfillan; J. C. Pillman; J. C. Sanderson; J. Quiller Rowett; E. J. Trustram; G. A. Witt; W. P. Wood; and Kenric B. Murray Secretary.The usual loyal toasts having been duly honoured, TheChairman,in opening the discussion, said the necessity for a clear definition of the rights of neutrals when War was being waged by two maritime powers had been exemplified in the present struggle. It was a matter of national and international importance, an intricate subject beset with legal difficulties, and in its operations it caused considerable commercial confusion. Therefore it would be an advantage to have it fully considered by men of experience and acknowledged ability who could inform them in a manner to which those who had only followed commercial careers could not aspire.DefinedLimitsDesirable.From the commercial view it was desirable that there should be a clearly defined limit of known exten which in time of war neutrals could observe. Although a the beginning of the war some difficulties existed in regard to contraband, they now rejoiced to know that better counsels had prevailed and at the present time there was nothing of which to complain in regard to the stoppage and surveillance of steamers, but they did not know how long that reasonable policy would continue. The Chairman then quoted a letter he had received expressing the regret of the writer at his absence, and suggesting the following points for discussion: That contraband of war should be abolished leaving it open for every nation to proclaim Tory Burch Flats blockade of as many of the enemy's ports as possible and prevent the ingress of goods of all kinds, but that the flags of neutrals upon the open seas should be respected and not interfered with. The writer believed that would lessen the prospect of war being declared;that it would be equal as between the belligerents;that it would tend to shorten war, if declared;that it would do away with the necessity of the police force on' the high seas and with .questions referring to prize courts, &cthat it would help commerce by the cessation of inquisitorial searches on the high seas and be good for trade in enabling neutrals to supply all commodities, including munitions of war, to belligerents if able to deliver their goods. Commenting on these points, the Chairman said that the abolition of contraband would simplify things very much, but there were many considerations requiring the most careful attention hsfore they could adopt the extreme view that he had read to them. Hear, hear.ProfessorWestukesaid that by the abolition of contraband undoubtedly England would benefit, because under the law of blockade she could intercept goods proceeding to her enemy, but it would certainly not have the assent of the leading maritime Powers.ContrabandDoctrineLikelyToContinue.He regarded the contraband doctrine as likely to continue, and could hope for no more than its reduction to tolerable limits. Of course, a neutral State would be going outside its functions, and would, in fact, be assisting in a war if it sold warlike material to a belligerent, but a State equally would be going outside its business if it interfered with a trade earned Tory Burch Outlet on by its subjects in time of peace. But then a belligerent claimed the right to intercept contraband in neutral vessels, and so they were in the presence 

 

. Roper Parkington

 

Wm. H. Quayle Jones; Professor Westlake, P.R.S Professor Holland; ProfessorBoydDawkins.P.R.S Capt. Herbert Thomson; Capt. Charles B. Balfour, M.P the Tory Burch Outlet Rev. W. H. Davies; and Messrs. T. G. Carver, K.C Charles Charleton; M. Mowat; John Chapman; Lewis R. S. Tomalin; W. Becket Hill; Stanley Machin; S. Gilfillan; J. C. Pillman; J. C. Sanderson; J. Quiller Rowett; E. J. Trustram; G. A. Witt; W. P. Wood; and Kenric B. Murray Secretary.The usual loyal toasts having been duly honoured, TheChairman,in opening the discussion, said the necessity for a clear definition of the rights of neutrals when War was being waged by two maritime powers had been exemplified in the present struggle. It was a matter of national and international importance, an intricate subject beset with legal difficulties, and in its operations it caused considerable commercial confusion. Therefore it would be an advantage to have it fully considered by men of experience and acknowledged ability who could inform them in a manner to which those who had only followed commercial careers could not aspire.DefinedLimitsDesirable.From the commercial view it was desirable that there should be a clearly defined limit of known exten which in time of war neutrals could observe. Although a the beginning of the war some difficulties existed in regard to contraband, they now rejoiced to know that better counsels had prevailed and at the present time there was nothing of which to complain in regard to the stoppage and surveillance of steamers, but they did not know how long that reasonable policy would continue. The Chairman then quoted a letter he had received expressing the regret of the writer at his absence, and suggesting the following points for discussion: That contraband of war should be abolished leaving it open for every nation to proclaim Tory Burch Flats blockade of as many of the enemy's ports as possible and prevent the ingress of goods of all kinds, but that the flags of neutrals upon the open seas should be respected and not interfered with. The writer believed that would lessen the prospect of war being declared;that it would be equal as between the belligerents;that it would tend to shorten war, if declared;that it would do away with the necessity of the police force on' the high seas and with .questions referring to prize courts, &cthat it would help commerce by the cessation of inquisitorial searches on the high seas and be good for trade in enabling neutrals to supply all commodities, including munitions of war, to belligerents if able to deliver their goods. Commenting on these points, the Chairman said that the abolition of contraband would simplify things very much, but there were many considerations requiring the most careful attention hsfore they could adopt the extreme view that he had read to them. Hear, hear.ProfessorWestukesaid that by the abolition of contraband undoubtedly England would benefit, because under the law of blockade she could intercept goods proceeding to her enemy, but it would certainly not have the assent of the leading maritime Powers.ContrabandDoctrineLikelyToContinue.He regarded the contraband doctrine as likely to continue, and could hope for no more than its reduction to tolerable limits. Of course, a neutral State would be going outside its functions, and would, in fact, be assisting in a war if it sold warlike material to a belligerent, but a State equally would be going outside its business if it interfered with a trade earned Tory Burch Outlet on by its subjects in time of peace. But then a belligerent claimed the right to intercept contraband in neutral vessels, and so they were in the presence 

 

Τι να προσέξετε !!

. Roper Parkington

 

Wm. H. Quayle Jones; Professor Westlake, P.R.S Professor Holland; ProfessorBoydDawkins.P.R.S Capt. Herbert Thomson; Capt. Charles B. Balfour, M.P the Tory Burch Outlet Rev. W. H. Davies; and Messrs. T. G. Carver, K.C Charles Charleton; M. Mowat; John Chapman; Lewis R. S. Tomalin; W. Becket Hill; Stanley Machin; S. Gilfillan; J. C. Pillman; J. C. Sanderson; J. Quiller Rowett; E. J. Trustram; G. A. Witt; W. P. Wood; and Kenric B. Murray Secretary.The usual loyal toasts having been duly honoured, TheChairman,in opening the discussion, said the necessity for a clear definition of the rights of neutrals when War was being waged by two maritime powers had been exemplified in the present struggle. It was a matter of national and international importance, an intricate subject beset with legal difficulties, and in its operations it caused considerable commercial confusion. Therefore it would be an advantage to have it fully considered by men of experience and acknowledged ability who could inform them in a manner to which those who had only followed commercial careers could not aspire.DefinedLimitsDesirable.From the commercial view it was desirable that there should be a clearly defined limit of known exten which in time of war neutrals could observe. Although a the beginning of the war some difficulties existed in regard to contraband, they now rejoiced to know that better counsels had prevailed and at the present time there was nothing of which to complain in regard to the stoppage and surveillance of steamers, but they did not know how long that reasonable policy would continue. The Chairman then quoted a letter he had received expressing the regret of the writer at his absence, and suggesting the following points for discussion: That contraband of war should be abolished leaving it open for every nation to proclaim Tory Burch Flats blockade of as many of the enemy's ports as possible and prevent the ingress of goods of all kinds, but that the flags of neutrals upon the open seas should be respected and not interfered with. The writer believed that would lessen the prospect of war being declared;that it would be equal as between the belligerents;that it would tend to shorten war, if declared;that it would do away with the necessity of the police force on' the high seas and with .questions referring to prize courts, &cthat it would help commerce by the cessation of inquisitorial searches on the high seas and be good for trade in enabling neutrals to supply all commodities, including munitions of war, to belligerents if able to deliver their goods. Commenting on these points, the Chairman said that the abolition of contraband would simplify things very much, but there were many considerations requiring the most careful attention hsfore they could adopt the extreme view that he had read to them. Hear, hear.ProfessorWestukesaid that by the abolition of contraband undoubtedly England would benefit, because under the law of blockade she could intercept goods proceeding to her enemy, but it would certainly not have the assent of the leading maritime Powers.ContrabandDoctrineLikelyToContinue.He regarded the contraband doctrine as likely to continue, and could hope for no more than its reduction to tolerable limits. Of course, a neutral State would be going outside its functions, and would, in fact, be assisting in a war if it sold warlike material to a belligerent, but a State equally would be going outside its business if it interfered with a trade earned Tory Burch Outlet on by its subjects in time of peace. But then a belligerent claimed the right to intercept contraband in neutral vessels, and so they were in the presence 

 



0
Δεν έχει βαθμολογηθεί
Η βαθμολογία σας: Κανένα




    RSS Feeds  |  Δημιουργία Ιστοσελίδας